BHSM_2016

May is Better Hearing & Speech Month

Know the Signs of Early Speech & Language Disorders

KingsbS&L Therapy2ury Center’s speech-language pathologists recommend that parents, especially those of young children, take time during the month of May to familiarize themselves with the signs of speech/language disorders and assess their children’s communication development.

It is not uncommon for parents to put off taking any action about a speech delay until a child is age three or older, according to The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Some parents may have had concerns for a year or longer before they take action. Parents with a concern are encouraged to seek an assessment from a speech-language pathologist right away for the best possible outcome.

Between birth to four years of age is an important stage in early detection of communication disorder. The early stages of speech and language disorders are easier to spot when you know the signs. Remember: The most common language disorders that young children experience are highly treatable, when identified early! Continue reading

Blog OT

Occupational Therapists Help with the “Jobs” of Daily Living

IMG_0302Melissa D. Hulton, OTR/L, Director of Occupational Therapy at The Kingsbury Center, explains what “occupational” means when discussing her profession.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me as an Occupational Therapist, “Do you help people get jobs?” I’d be rich (in the monetary sense). I already consider myself “rich” in terms of having a satisfying and enriching profession. Now to answer the question I’m often asked, no, it is not the role of an Occupational Therapist to find employment for people.

So why is “occupational” used to describe this line of work? Occupation is not just a person’s job or profession. It is also defined as an activity that a person spends time doing. Occupational Therapists (OTs) work with individuals throughout the lifespan who are affected by an injury or disability. OTs use therapeutic activities to help their clients become as independent and functional as possible in the “activities” that they both need and desire to do.

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Speech Language

Students Speak on the Value of Speech Services

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Interim Director of Speech and Language Services at The Kingsbury Center. She authored this blog, based on her years of experience facilitating client communication skills. 

 

The best way to demonstrate how Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) transform the lives of others is by going straight to the source. Students who receive speech services at Kingsbury were recently interviewed and asked to describe how their struggles with communication and language (whether it be spoken or written) impacted their lives. Their responses demonstrate the variety of ways that speech services can support them, both in and out of school.

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Book Review: Diary of a Social Detective by Jeffrey E. Jessum, Ph.D.

Social DetectiveMiddle school is a challenging time of life for most students. They often feel uncomfortable in their own skin as their bodies and brains mature and they also have become more aware of being the focus of attention. If they aren’t constantly looking in the mirror, they are checking to see if someone else is watching them. For students with social communication issues or Autism Spectrum Disorder, this transition can be particularly confusing and painful. Suddenly, social interactions are way more complex and these kids are bewildered at the same time they would like a little social support to smooth their path. They often desire friends but have difficulty recognizing signals from others and getting the social context right. Continue reading

Freud or Betty Crocker: What’s Cooking?

Anna Freud, daughter of Sigmund, was also an influential psychoanalyst and worked predominantly with children who experienced deprivation. She was the first psychologist to recognize the importance of food as a therapeutic tool. Providing food was seen as a “corrective emotional experience” for children whose basic needs had been inconsistently met. This point of view had its detractors and it became suspect to “gratify children’s wishes”.   Hostility to the pleasures of food and eating is a theme that continues today in rigid diet regimens and the constant barrage of food-bashing in the media. Continue reading

Thinking Interdependently: What’s that have to do with Easter?

Habits of Mind, developed by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick, are “characteristics that are employed by successful people when they are confronted with problems.” Developing these 16 traits or skills can be particularly challenging for people with learning disabilities.

In my last blog post, I explored the habit of persisting. With the approach of Easter, Passover, Mother’s Day and other springtime occasions when families and friends gather together, I thought I would present the habit of thinking interdependently. Continue reading