Kingsbury’s HOPE Program Serves the Disenfranchised

Tamika_smTamika McPherson, M.Ed., is the Director of HOPE at Kingsbury Day School. Her blog describes how the HOPE program is impacting the education and lives of disenfranchised youths in the DC metro area.

The Need for HOPE

The statistics are not encouraging. Students with Learning Disabilities (LD) continue to experience one of the highest drop-out rates among all students with disabilities (other than those with emotional disturbance). Their inability to complete traditional high school programs is due to any number of factors, including a history of school failure, learning differences that have gone undiagnosed and/or untreated, parenthood, economic hardship or other societal issues. Continue reading

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A Physical Therapist Who Doesn’t Like to Write

CherylCheryl Farley, Director of Physical Therapy Services at The Kingsbury Center, shares her love for helping children gain, regain or improve their physical abilities so they can lead a fuller life.

When friends ask what I like best about my job, I answer without hesitation: I love working with the kids I serve at The Kingsbury Center. When asked what I like least about my job, I answer just as quickly: I’m not a fan of the paperwork that goes along with the profession. Continue reading

Coaching Student-Athletes with Learning Differences

Joe MKingsbury’s Athletic Director and JV Basketball Coach, Mr. Stephon Hampton, and Mr. Joe Moten, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach, were interviewed following their successful seasons. Winning the 2015 League championships was a remarkable achievement given the fact that Kingsbury lacks a gymnasium. The teams practice on the outdoor basketball court and run drills and do weight training inside the building. Our student-athletes compete in a league consisting of teams from schools that serve students with learning differences, as well as charter schools and private schools without an LD focus. Continue reading

Chaos to Order

11 Ways to De-Clutter Your Mental Workspace

The research is clear, multitasking doesn’t work, yet we do it anyway. Parents worry about their children growing up in a buzzing, chirping, and otherwise media-interrupting world, but adults too are being swallowed up by distraction. In an attempt to get more done at once, we are becoming less productive. We are passively allowing our work and personal lives to be interrupted again and again with little to show for it. It’s time we put some real thought into how we manage the information flow in our lives. If you want to see better work habits in your children, you can start by taking care of your own. Here are some ways to clean up your mental clutter and improve your productivity. Continue reading

Freud or Betty Crocker: What’s Cooking?

Anna Freud, daughter of Sigmund, was also an influential psychoanalyst and worked predominantly with children who experienced deprivation. She was the first psychologist to recognize the importance of food as a therapeutic tool. Providing food was seen as a “corrective emotional experience” for children whose basic needs had been inconsistently met. This point of view had its detractors and it became suspect to “gratify children’s wishes”.   Hostility to the pleasures of food and eating is a theme that continues today in rigid diet regimens and the constant barrage of food-bashing in the media. Continue reading

From Boys to Men

Dr. JBy Dr. Charlie Johnson

I have worked with pre-adolescent and adolescent males, primarily African-American, but other racial and ethnic groups as well, for more than 25 years. In my 15 years at The Kingsbury Center, I have specialized in working with those who have some sort of learning disability, be it a struggle to read, despite average intelligence; or slow processing, which inhibits the ability to work in “real time”; or internal distractions, like attention or anxiety, which make it challenging to be an effective learner, both in terms of academics and in appropriate social and emotional functioning. My overarching goal is to help these boys successfully transition to manhood. What I have observed in emerging young men over the years leads me to share my personal perspective on a phenomenon that causes me great concern: too many young men are not being successfully “launched.” Continue reading

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The Nuts and Bolts of Persistence

Ann Rowe bio picAs Dr. Chobot, Kingsbury CEO and Head of School, indicated in a recent post, persistence is an important quality, or Habit of Mind, for effective individuals in academics and work life. In addition, it helps with parenting, pursuing a sport and other activities of daily life. She noted, not surprisingly, that individuals with learning challenges often struggle with persistence. Continue reading