Book Review: A Disease Called Childhood

photoOver the past 30 years or so, ADHD (Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) has grown from an inglorious collection of symptoms into a household name. Approximately 11 percent of children and 15 percent of adolescents in the United States are diagnosed with ADHD. Each American child is 6 times more likely to receive the diagnosis than a child in France and 60 times more likely than a child in Finland. In her recently published book, A Disease Called Childhood, psychologist Marilyn Wedge set out to find out why ADHD became an “American epidemic.” She concludes with a decisive stance against the medicalization of childhood behavior, rampant prescription of stimulants classified as addictive and widespread misrepresentation of research in the name of ADHD. Continue reading