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I Witness First-Hand the Amazing Transformations!

Kelly

Blog by Kelly

Can I tell you how pleasantly surprised I was to be offered a position at the Kingsbury Center in February of 2012? After serving, for over a decade, at a law firm that represents students with learning disabilities, I am now able to see, first-hand, the amazing transformations going on at the Kingsbury Center!

I had heard great things about Kingsbury Day School. Now that I am happily employed here, I can attest to the truth of what I’d been told. I am supported by outstanding faculty and staff who serve children and adults with learning differences. I am proud to be associated with the growth and achievements of our dedicated and deserving students as I watch them transform from students below grade level in academics to mastering goals which they (and their families) had not thought possible. I see students coming here from all walks of life, struggling to cope socially and academically, and from schools where they felt like failures. It’s not long before they achieve great confidence in their abilities here at Kingsbury. I see young students advocate for themselves when they, initially, did not have the confidence to do so. Each student strives to please their teachers and to master their individualized goals.

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Staff celebrate College Day.

Students are observed, supported and provided related services, such as speech therapy, counseling, tutoring, occupational therapy and physical therapy in accordance with their individualized educational plan. Students thrive with Eagle PRIDE, our positive behavior program that rewards students for being Prepared, being Respectful, having Integrity, being Dedicated and demonstrating Excellence.

 

Upper School students can participate in clubs and activities, enjoy school dances and

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Our students earn high school diplomas.

prom, compete in our interscholastic athletic program, and choose to take Advanced Placement classes as they prepare for college-level work. With the strong support of the High School Guidance Counselor, seniors study for the SAT and ACT and apply to colleges they hope to attend. They further prepare for the transition to life beyond high school by learning financial planning basics, researching careers and honing their job application skills. They can request to be selected as Student Ambassadors, who attend school fairs and Admissions Open Houses and are proud to endorse their own educational experience at Kingsbury. They are professional young adults ready to explore higher education and/or to enter the world of work.

 

In a matter of weeks, a new student is able to make friends here at Kingsbury. Students build positive relationships with their peers and staff that stretch beyond their current attendance to visiting us long after they have graduated. They are eager to tell us of their success in life and to thank faculty and staff for the support that made a world of difference in their lives. Our Annual Alumni Event, held each January, provides graduates with the opportunity to return to campus for an evening of food, music and socializing with classmates, teachers, related services providers and other staff members.

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2016 Alumni Event

I believe in the power of education. I believe that people helping people is the only way to achieve greatness and peace. The Kingsbury Center provides a transformative educational and social experience to children and young adults with learning differences. Our focus is putting the student first; we are highly dedicated to providing quality education with 21st century technology! The Kingsbury Center is nestled within the beauty of a quiet residential neighborhood in Northwest Washington, D.C. where a wide variety of opportunity awaits our students. It’s an honor to serve them and their families.

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Exam Tips for Students with Learning Differences

The Kingsbury CenterEvelyn Montgomery,  M.Ed., CAGS, is Upper and Middle School Director at Kingsbury Day School. She shares some tips to help students with learning differences to prepare for exams.

Many schools are nearing the end of the first semester, which means exam time is approaching. If you’re the parent of a student with learning differences and/or attention difficulties, you already know that studying for exams can be particularly stressful and challenging for your teen. IEP accommodations and modifications, differentiated instruction and a range of teaching strategies no doubt assisted your child to understand the content of a unit of study. Unless he or she has properly prepared for the exam, however, panic may prevail when they are asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material. Continue reading

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Occupational Therapists Help with the “Jobs” of Daily Living

IMG_0302Melissa D. Hulton, OTR/L, Director of Occupational Therapy at The Kingsbury Center, explains what “occupational” means when discussing her profession.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me as an Occupational Therapist, “Do you help people get jobs?” I’d be rich (in the monetary sense). I already consider myself “rich” in terms of having a satisfying and enriching profession. Now to answer the question I’m often asked, no, it is not the role of an Occupational Therapist to find employment for people.

So why is “occupational” used to describe this line of work? Occupation is not just a person’s job or profession. It is also defined as an activity that a person spends time doing. Occupational Therapists (OTs) work with individuals throughout the lifespan who are affected by an injury or disability. OTs use therapeutic activities to help their clients become as independent and functional as possible in the “activities” that they both need and desire to do.

Continue reading

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When Communicating with Teens, Less is More

There are a few changes parents typically expect as their youngsters grow into adolescence. Most parents know to expect a good portion of brooding, irritability and social drama. They expect their children’s bodies to change and their sexuality to become more pronounced. Parents know that kids will rebel and talk back, and that they are likely to experiment with things you wish they wouldn’t. Continue reading

Thinking Interdependently: What’s that have to do with Easter?

Habits of Mind, developed by Arthur L. Costa and Bena Kallick, are “characteristics that are employed by successful people when they are confronted with problems.” Developing these 16 traits or skills can be particularly challenging for people with learning disabilities.

In my last blog post, I explored the habit of persisting. With the approach of Easter, Passover, Mother’s Day and other springtime occasions when families and friends gather together, I thought I would present the habit of thinking interdependently. Continue reading

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The Nuts and Bolts of Persistence

Ann Rowe bio picAs Dr. Chobot, Kingsbury CEO and Head of School, indicated in a recent post, persistence is an important quality, or Habit of Mind, for effective individuals in academics and work life. In addition, it helps with parenting, pursuing a sport and other activities of daily life. She noted, not surprisingly, that individuals with learning challenges often struggle with persistence. Continue reading

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Persistence is a Challenge for Learning Disabled Individuals

Dr. Peri-Anne Chobot

Dr. Peri-Anne Chobot

Habits of Mind, developed by Arthur L. Costs and Bena Kallick, are “characteristics that are employed by successful people when they are confronted with problems.” They identify problem-solving, life-related skills that are necessary to effectively operate in society. Published in 2009, Learning and Leading with Habits of Mind continue to provide an effective means to promote strategic reasoning, insightfulness, perseverance, creativity and craftsmanship. Continue reading