Capstone3b

Kingsbury Seniors Finalize Their Capstone Projects

By Lauren Thomson

12th Grade English Teacher

Kingsbury Day School

The Kingsbury Day School Senior Capstone Project began four years ago under the direction of Dr. Peri-Anne Chobot and former English teacher, Jamie Flores. “Capstone provides seniors with an opportunity to use the academic skills acquired during their time at Kingsbury to delve deeply into an area of personal interest. The process encourages our seniors to carry that personal passion with them as they venture into the world beyond Kingsbury Day School,” Dr. Chobot explained.

Capstone1bThere are four major components to the Capstone project:

  • a research paper
  • an electronic portfolio
  • a product/performance and
  • a presentation to the Kingsbury Day School community.

Each stage in the process requires seniors to sharpen skills that will prove to be of value when they pursue higher education or enter the workforce. These skills include researching, critical reading, analytical writing, editing and public speaking.

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Kingsbury’s HOPE Program Serves the Disenfranchised

Tamika_smTamika McPherson, M.Ed., is the Director of HOPE at Kingsbury Day School. Her blog describes how the HOPE program is impacting the education and lives of disenfranchised youths in the DC metro area.

The Need for HOPE

The statistics are not encouraging. Students with Learning Disabilities (LD) continue to experience one of the highest drop-out rates among all students with disabilities (other than those with emotional disturbance). Their inability to complete traditional high school programs is due to any number of factors, including a history of school failure, learning differences that have gone undiagnosed and/or untreated, parenthood, economic hardship or other societal issues. Continue reading

P1010074

Exam Tips for Students with Learning Differences

The Kingsbury CenterEvelyn Montgomery,  M.Ed., CAGS, is Upper and Middle School Director at Kingsbury Day School. She shares some tips to help students with learning differences to prepare for exams.

Many schools are nearing the end of the first semester, which means exam time is approaching. If you’re the parent of a student with learning differences and/or attention difficulties, you already know that studying for exams can be particularly stressful and challenging for your teen. IEP accommodations and modifications, differentiated instruction and a range of teaching strategies no doubt assisted your child to understand the content of a unit of study. Unless he or she has properly prepared for the exam, however, panic may prevail when they are asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material. Continue reading

Blog OT

Occupational Therapists Help with the “Jobs” of Daily Living

IMG_0302Melissa D. Hulton, OTR/L, Director of Occupational Therapy at The Kingsbury Center, explains what “occupational” means when discussing her profession.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me as an Occupational Therapist, “Do you help people get jobs?” I’d be rich (in the monetary sense). I already consider myself “rich” in terms of having a satisfying and enriching profession. Now to answer the question I’m often asked, no, it is not the role of an Occupational Therapist to find employment for people.

So why is “occupational” used to describe this line of work? Occupation is not just a person’s job or profession. It is also defined as an activity that a person spends time doing. Occupational Therapists (OTs) work with individuals throughout the lifespan who are affected by an injury or disability. OTs use therapeutic activities to help their clients become as independent and functional as possible in the “activities” that they both need and desire to do.

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Speech Language

Students Speak on the Value of Speech Services

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Interim Director of Speech and Language Services at The Kingsbury Center. She authored this blog, based on her years of experience facilitating client communication skills. 

 

The best way to demonstrate how Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) transform the lives of others is by going straight to the source. Students who receive speech services at Kingsbury were recently interviewed and asked to describe how their struggles with communication and language (whether it be spoken or written) impacted their lives. Their responses demonstrate the variety of ways that speech services can support them, both in and out of school.

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PT3

A Physical Therapist Who Doesn’t Like to Write

CherylCheryl Farley, Director of Physical Therapy Services at The Kingsbury Center, shares her love for helping children gain, regain or improve their physical abilities so they can lead a fuller life.

When friends ask what I like best about my job, I answer without hesitation: I love working with the kids I serve at The Kingsbury Center. When asked what I like least about my job, I answer just as quickly: I’m not a fan of the paperwork that goes along with the profession. Continue reading

Coaching Student-Athletes with Learning Differences

Joe MKingsbury’s Athletic Director and JV Basketball Coach, Mr. Stephon Hampton, and Mr. Joe Moten, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach, were interviewed following their successful seasons. Winning the 2015 League championships was a remarkable achievement given the fact that Kingsbury lacks a gymnasium. The teams practice on the outdoor basketball court and run drills and do weight training inside the building. Our student-athletes compete in a league consisting of teams from schools that serve students with learning differences, as well as charter schools and private schools without an LD focus. Continue reading