Occupational Therapists Help with the “Jobs” of Daily Living

IMG_0302Melissa D. Hulton, OTR/L, Director of Occupational Therapy at The Kingsbury Center, explains what “occupational” means when discussing her profession.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me as an Occupational Therapist, “Do you help people get jobs?” I’d be rich (in the monetary sense). I already consider myself “rich” in terms of having a satisfying and enriching profession. Now to answer the question I’m often asked, no, it is not the role of an Occupational Therapist to find employment for people.

So why is “occupational” used to describe this line of work? Occupation is not just a person’s job or profession. It is also defined as an activity that a person spends time doing. Occupational Therapists (OTs) work with individuals throughout the lifespan who are affected by an injury or disability. OTs use therapeutic activities to help their clients become as independent and functional as possible in the “activities” that they both need and desire to do.

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Coaching Student-Athletes with Learning Differences

Joe MKingsbury’s Athletic Director and JV Basketball Coach, Mr. Stephon Hampton, and Mr. Joe Moten, Boys Varsity Basketball Coach, were interviewed following their successful seasons. Winning the 2015 League championships was a remarkable achievement given the fact that Kingsbury lacks a gymnasium. The teams practice on the outdoor basketball court and run drills and do weight training inside the building. Our student-athletes compete in a league consisting of teams from schools that serve students with learning differences, as well as charter schools and private schools without an LD focus. Continue reading

11 Ways to De-Clutter Your Mental Workspace

The research is clear, multitasking doesn’t work, yet we do it anyway. Parents worry about their children growing up in a buzzing, chirping, and otherwise media-interrupting world, but adults too are being swallowed up by distraction. In an attempt to get more done at once, we are becoming less productive. We are passively allowing our work and personal lives to be interrupted again and again with little to show for it. It’s time we put some real thought into how we manage the information flow in our lives. If you want to see better work habits in your children, you can start by taking care of your own. Here are some ways to clean up your mental clutter and improve your productivity. Continue reading

We Exaggerate our Multitasking Abilities

Take a moment and give yourself a Multitask Rating from 1 to 10. Let’s say a score of 1 goes to the utterly hopeless multitasker and 10 goes to the mental black belt of the divided mind. Can you read email while conversing with a friend; book a plane ticket during the board meeting; do your homework and still pay attention to that movie; or text your friends while driving to let them know you’re “almost there?” Many of you will quickly answer yes to those questions without giving it a second thought. Continue reading