Is Your Senior Financially Literate?

Angela Steele is the Upper School Guidance and College Counselor at Kingsbury Day School. She teaches Transition Classes on College Prep and Financial Planning to help Kingsbury seniors prepare for life beyond high school. In her blog, she shares advice for the parents of members of the Class of 2016.

Is it safe to say that many high school seniors graduate without having knowledge of financial literacy? Speaking for myself, if I knew then what I know now, I would be in great shape! My goal now, as a college and guidance counselor, is to ready my students for the real world (i.e., life after high school). That could involve college or it could involve working for a paycheck or it could involve both.

Financial Planning Word Cloud

As students prepare for graduation, they should also prepare for independent living and financial responsibility. Financial literacy is the ability to understand how money works in the world. Before heading off to college or the world of work, our young adults should know how to earn or make money; how to manage money; how to invest money; and how to donate money to help others. Continue reading

Kingsbury’s HOPE Program Serves the Disenfranchised

Tamika_smTamika McPherson, M.Ed., is the Director of HOPE at Kingsbury Day School. Her blog describes how the HOPE program is impacting the education and lives of disenfranchised youths in the DC metro area.

The Need for HOPE

The statistics are not encouraging. Students with Learning Disabilities (LD) continue to experience one of the highest drop-out rates among all students with disabilities (other than those with emotional disturbance). Their inability to complete traditional high school programs is due to any number of factors, including a history of school failure, learning differences that have gone undiagnosed and/or untreated, parenthood, economic hardship or other societal issues. Continue reading

Exam Tips for Students with Learning Differences

The Kingsbury CenterEvelyn Montgomery,  M.Ed., CAGS, is Upper and Middle School Director at Kingsbury Day School. She shares some tips to help students with learning differences to prepare for exams.

Many schools are nearing the end of the first semester, which means exam time is approaching. If you’re the parent of a student with learning differences and/or attention difficulties, you already know that studying for exams can be particularly stressful and challenging for your teen. IEP accommodations and modifications, differentiated instruction and a range of teaching strategies no doubt assisted your child to understand the content of a unit of study. Unless he or she has properly prepared for the exam, however, panic may prevail when they are asked to demonstrate their understanding of the material. Continue reading

Occupational Therapists Help with the “Jobs” of Daily Living

IMG_0302Melissa D. Hulton, OTR/L, Director of Occupational Therapy at The Kingsbury Center, explains what “occupational” means when discussing her profession.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me as an Occupational Therapist, “Do you help people get jobs?” I’d be rich (in the monetary sense). I already consider myself “rich” in terms of having a satisfying and enriching profession. Now to answer the question I’m often asked, no, it is not the role of an Occupational Therapist to find employment for people.

So why is “occupational” used to describe this line of work? Occupation is not just a person’s job or profession. It is also defined as an activity that a person spends time doing. Occupational Therapists (OTs) work with individuals throughout the lifespan who are affected by an injury or disability. OTs use therapeutic activities to help their clients become as independent and functional as possible in the “activities” that they both need and desire to do.

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Students Speak on the Value of Speech Services

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Interim Director of Speech and Language Services at The Kingsbury Center. She authored this blog, based on her years of experience facilitating client communication skills. 

 

The best way to demonstrate how Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) transform the lives of others is by going straight to the source. Students who receive speech services at Kingsbury were recently interviewed and asked to describe how their struggles with communication and language (whether it be spoken or written) impacted their lives. Their responses demonstrate the variety of ways that speech services can support them, both in and out of school.

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Should I Help My Child Prepare for WISC-V?

In this blog post, Dr. Ellen Iscoe expands on her recent “What is this New WISC-V?” article.ellen

Sure! In his book “Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Culture Count,” Richard E. Nesbitt, a prominent cognitive psychologist, stresses the importance of nonhereditary factors in determining I.Q. He suggests a number of steps parents can take, starting before the birth of the child, to boost their child’s I.Q. If your child is already school-age, your efforts can still have an impact.

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What is this New WISC-V?

ellenAdmissions season is here, and calls are streaming into The Kingsbury Center inquiring about the WISC-V, the new test for children age six and up who are applying to independent schools. Along with the usual questions about scheduling, there is one question some parents ask directly and others tip-toe around: What is this new ‘WISC-V’? Are there things I should know about this latest edition? Do I need to do something different to prepare my child? Continue reading