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May is Better Hearing & Speech Month

Know the Signs of Early Speech & Language Disorders

KingsbS&L Therapy2ury Center’s speech-language pathologists recommend that parents, especially those of young children, take time during the month of May to familiarize themselves with the signs of speech/language disorders and assess their children’s communication development.

It is not uncommon for parents to put off taking any action about a speech delay until a child is age three or older, according to The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association. Some parents may have had concerns for a year or longer before they take action. Parents with a concern are encouraged to seek an assessment from a speech-language pathologist right away for the best possible outcome.

Between birth to four years of age is an important stage in early detection of communication disorder. The early stages of speech and language disorders are easier to spot when you know the signs. Remember: The most common language disorders that young children experience are highly treatable, when identified early! Continue reading

Green foliage bursts out in Dows Lake Park in Ottawa, Canada.  Pedestrian path and bridge on a warm springtime afternoon.

Spring’s Wisdom – Setting us in Motion and Reinvigorating our Senses

This week’s blog was authored by Kathleen Pyne, OTR/L, who provides therapeutic services to students at Kingsbury Day School

In springtime, our surroundings tell us that new life can come from dormancy. Like the blossoming trees and flowers around us, we humans are living and growing beings. As we emerge from our winter hideaways, enjoying the warmer weather and spending time outside will enrich our souls as well as enhance our health. Continue reading

Senior with allergies

Tips for Seasonal Allergy Sufferers

This blog was written by Michele Kuhn, RN, who has been serving the Kingsbury Day School community for five years.

Pollen Polen Polline Pyek PlenPollen has been falling from trees and plants in DC for weeks. That means that spring allergies are in full swing. Many students and staff are experiencing symptoms which can include: runny nose, nasal congestion, watery/itchy eyes, post-nasal drip, coughing, sneezing, headache, irritability and fatigue.

Seasonal allergy symptoms can be quite annoying and distracting and can create difficulties concentrating in school. What can an allergy sufferer do to minimize their discomfort? While allergies can’t be cured, there are steps you can take to relieve seasonal allergy symptoms or avoid getting the symptoms. Continue reading

Child at playground
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It’s Spring: Time for Outdoor Fun!

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Cheryl Farley, MSPT, is a certified, licensed and experienced physical therapist at The Kingsbury Center. With Spring approaching, she share some tips for helping your child to enjoy the outdoors (while also working their muscles!).

 

I am starting to think about spring! After months of spending time indoors, the days are getting longer and it is time to start taking evening walks around the neighborhood or playing in the backyard after dinner.

As a physical therapist I often get asked by parents for ideas for activities they can do at home with their children to help improve their gross motor skills. So here is a list of a few fun outdoor activities that can help work your child’s muscles without them knowing they are working! Continue reading

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Occupational Therapists Help with the “Jobs” of Daily Living

IMG_0302Melissa D. Hulton, OTR/L, Director of Occupational Therapy at The Kingsbury Center, explains what “occupational” means when discussing her profession.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me as an Occupational Therapist, “Do you help people get jobs?” I’d be rich (in the monetary sense). I already consider myself “rich” in terms of having a satisfying and enriching profession. Now to answer the question I’m often asked, no, it is not the role of an Occupational Therapist to find employment for people.

So why is “occupational” used to describe this line of work? Occupation is not just a person’s job or profession. It is also defined as an activity that a person spends time doing. Occupational Therapists (OTs) work with individuals throughout the lifespan who are affected by an injury or disability. OTs use therapeutic activities to help their clients become as independent and functional as possible in the “activities” that they both need and desire to do.

Continue reading

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A Physical Therapist Who Doesn’t Like to Write

CherylCheryl Farley, Director of Physical Therapy Services at The Kingsbury Center, shares her love for helping children gain, regain or improve their physical abilities so they can lead a fuller life.

When friends ask what I like best about my job, I answer without hesitation: I love working with the kids I serve at The Kingsbury Center. When asked what I like least about my job, I answer just as quickly: I’m not a fan of the paperwork that goes along with the profession. Continue reading

Reflexology and Nutrition can Decrease Severity of ADHD

Mark Dennis, Kingsbury P.E. Assistant

Mark Dennis, Kingsbury P.E. Assistant

Mark Dennis, who teaches fitness to Kingsbury’s Middle School students, is a certified reflexologist. He authored this blog, based on his experience providing reflexology massage and nutrition advice to children with ADHD. 

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) is one of the more common mental disorders that are known to begin in early childhood. An estimated 10 percent of all children worldwide are diagnosed with ADHD. They may exhibit inattention, impulse control issues, restless feet, frequent change of position and a marked loss of hand-eye coordination. Continue reading