When Communicating with Teens, Less is More

There are a few changes parents typically expect as their youngsters grow into adolescence. Most parents know to expect a good portion of brooding, irritability and social drama. They expect their children’s bodies to change and their sexuality to become more pronounced. Parents know that kids will rebel and talk back, and that they are likely to experiment with things you wish they wouldn’t. Continue reading

11 Ways to De-Clutter Your Mental Workspace

The research is clear, multitasking doesn’t work, yet we do it anyway. Parents worry about their children growing up in a buzzing, chirping, and otherwise media-interrupting world, but adults too are being swallowed up by distraction. In an attempt to get more done at once, we are becoming less productive. We are passively allowing our work and personal lives to be interrupted again and again with little to show for it. It’s time we put some real thought into how we manage the information flow in our lives. If you want to see better work habits in your children, you can start by taking care of your own. Here are some ways to clean up your mental clutter and improve your productivity. Continue reading

Book Review: A Disease Called Childhood

photoOver the past 30 years or so, ADHD (Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder) has grown from an inglorious collection of symptoms into a household name. Approximately 11 percent of children and 15 percent of adolescents in the United States are diagnosed with ADHD. Each American child is 6 times more likely to receive the diagnosis than a child in France and 60 times more likely than a child in Finland. In her recently published book, A Disease Called Childhood, psychologist Marilyn Wedge set out to find out why ADHD became an “American epidemic.” She concludes with a decisive stance against the medicalization of childhood behavior, rampant prescription of stimulants classified as addictive and widespread misrepresentation of research in the name of ADHD. Continue reading

Helping High School Seniors Cope with College Rejection

It’s a time of anticipation for high school seniors everywhere. With the support of their parents, they have toiled over ways to jam the essence of their lives into a single page statement, visited schools, imagined themselves as college students, and walked through the gauntlet that is standardized testing. For some, the anticipation is nothing more than a waiting game; nothing to worry about. For others, it seems as though their entire lives are held to an appraisal of pass or fail, accepted or denied. Continue reading

How DNA Influences Your Child On Valentine’s Day

Amidst the rush to find socks and complete homework and mediate arguments, you might pause as Valentine’s Day approaches to wonder: “Will this child I love ever have a special someone in his or her life?” It may seem distant from the morning’s discussion of why ketchup is or is not a vegetable, but in your mutual future you know it is coming: crushes, romance begun and ended via text, and that sweet smile you love, directed at someone else. But how does that first connection even occur, and why does it come so easily for some, but not for others? Continue reading

We Exaggerate our Multitasking Abilities

Take a moment and give yourself a Multitask Rating from 1 to 10. Let’s say a score of 1 goes to the utterly hopeless multitasker and 10 goes to the mental black belt of the divided mind. Can you read email while conversing with a friend; book a plane ticket during the board meeting; do your homework and still pay attention to that movie; or text your friends while driving to let them know you’re “almost there?” Many of you will quickly answer yes to those questions without giving it a second thought. Continue reading