Blog OT

Occupational Therapists Help with the “Jobs” of Daily Living

IMG_0302Melissa D. Hulton, OTR/L, Director of Occupational Therapy at The Kingsbury Center, explains what “occupational” means when discussing her profession.

If I had a dollar for every time someone asked me as an Occupational Therapist, “Do you help people get jobs?” I’d be rich (in the monetary sense). I already consider myself “rich” in terms of having a satisfying and enriching profession. Now to answer the question I’m often asked, no, it is not the role of an Occupational Therapist to find employment for people.

So why is “occupational” used to describe this line of work? Occupation is not just a person’s job or profession. It is also defined as an activity that a person spends time doing. Occupational Therapists (OTs) work with individuals throughout the lifespan who are affected by an injury or disability. OTs use therapeutic activities to help their clients become as independent and functional as possible in the “activities” that they both need and desire to do.

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Speech Language

Students Speak on the Value of Speech Services

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP

Alex Sullivan, M.A., CCC-SLP, is the Interim Director of Speech and Language Services at The Kingsbury Center. She authored this blog, based on her years of experience facilitating client communication skills. 

 

The best way to demonstrate how Speech-Language Pathologists (SLPs) transform the lives of others is by going straight to the source. Students who receive speech services at Kingsbury were recently interviewed and asked to describe how their struggles with communication and language (whether it be spoken or written) impacted their lives. Their responses demonstrate the variety of ways that speech services can support them, both in and out of school.

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Intelligence Concept Hand Drawn on Chalkboard. Blurred Background. Toned Image.

Should I Help My Child Prepare for WISC-V?

In this blog post, Dr. Ellen Iscoe expands on her recent “What is this New WISC-V?” article.ellen

Sure! In his book “Intelligence and How to Get It: Why Schools and Culture Count,” Richard E. Nesbitt, a prominent cognitive psychologist, stresses the importance of nonhereditary factors in determining I.Q. He suggests a number of steps parents can take, starting before the birth of the child, to boost their child’s I.Q. If your child is already school-age, your efforts can still have an impact.

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